Lana Del Rey says that her ongoing copyright infringement lawsuit with Radiohead is over.

On Sunday night during her performance at Lollapalooza Brazil, the singer told the crowd, “I mean, now that my lawsuit’s over, I guess I can sing that song anytime I want, right?”

She made the statement after performing her song “Get Free,” which she said resulted in a lawsuit earlier this year from Radiohead, whom Del Rey said took legal action over the similarities between Rey’s track and their classic “Creep.”

“It’s true about the lawsuit. Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by Creep, Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing – I offered up to 40 over the last few months but they will only accept 100. Their lawyers have been relentless, so we will deal with it in court.”

A spokesperson for Radiohead told The Sun, “It’s understood that Radiohead’s team are hoping for the band to either receive compensation or be credited on the list of songwriters to receive royalties.” However, later a spokesperson for Radiohead’s publisher (Warner/Chappell) refuted the claim that there was a lawsuit, contending that no legal action had yet been taken by the band. This spokesperson told Pitchfork in January:

As Radiohead’s music publisher, it’s true that we’ve been in discussions since August of last year with Lana Del Rey’s representatives. It’s clear that the verses of “Get Free” use musical elements found in the verses of “Creep” and we’ve requested that this be acknowledged in favour of all writers of “Creep.” To set the record straight, no lawsuit has been issued and Radiohead have not said they “will only accept 100%” of the publishing of “Get Free.”

– Excerpt from an article by Lizzie Manno for Paste Magazine. See the full article here

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