Music Mondays – Michael Jackson’s Estate to Pay $9.4 Million in Royalties to Quincy Jones

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury on Wednesday found that Michael Jackson‘s estate owes Quincy Jones $9.4 million in royalties and production fees from “Billie Jean,” ”Thriller” and more of the superstar’s biggest hits.

The award from a Los Angeles Superior Court jury fell short of the $30 million the legendary producer sought in the lawsuit filed nearly four years ago, but well above the approximately $392,000 the Jackson estate contended Jones was owed.

The jury of 10 women and two men had been deliberating since Monday.

“This lawsuit was never about Michael, it was about protecting the integrity of the work we all did in the recording studio and the legacy of what we created,” Jones wrote in a statement. “Although this (judgment) is not the full amount that I was seeking, I am very grateful that the jury decided in our favor in this matter. I view it not only as a victory for myself personally, but for artists’ rights overall.”

Estate attorney Howard Weitzman said he and his team were surprised by the verdict and would appeal it.

Weitzman and co-counsel Zia Modabber wrote in a statement that Jones was seeking money that wasn’t owed to him.

111hrthrt

Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones. 

“Any amount above and beyond what is called for in his contracts is too much and unfair to Michael’s heirs,” the lawyers said. “Although Mr. Jones is portraying this is a victory for artists’ rights, the real artist is Michael Jackson and it is his money Mr. Jones is seeking.”

Jones claimed in the lawsuit that Jackson’s estate and Sony Music Entertainment owed him for music he had produced that was used in the concert film “This Is It” and two Cirque du Soleil shows that used Jackson’s songs.

The lawsuit said the entities had improperly re-edited the songs to deprive Jones of royalties and production fees, and that he had a contractual right to take first crack at any re-edit or remix.

The Jackson camp held that Jones should only be paid licensing fees for songs used in those three productions. Jones claimed he was entitled to a share of the overall receipts from them.

This is an excerpt taken from an article was written by Brian Melley of the AP, with contribution from the AP’s Andrew Dalton. Find the full article here

—————————————————————————————————————————–

Disclaimer: Please note that the information contained within this news post and site is offered simply as a consideration to visitors who are in the entertainment industry and are seeking to learn more about various areas of entertainment, be it in film, movies, television, music, digital, new media, film financing, merchandising and/or branding. As such, the information so provided should never be construed as legal advice. If you need further assistance or legal advice for your specific matter, please do not hesitate in contacting an entertainment attorney (film, music, digital, licensing, financing) here in Los Angeles, California at The Hollywood Lawyer by(1) emailing us at info@hollywoodlawyer.com; (2) calling us at (323) 300-4184; or (3) filling out our online form. www.thehollywoodlawyer.com

About thehollywoodlawyer (286 Articles)
At The Hollywood Lawyer in Los Angeles, our entertainment attorneys are committed to assisting all talent (actors, artists, singers, writers, dancers, directors, producers, directors, editors, engineers, executives), entertainment companies (film studios, recording facilities, record labels, management companies, agencies, publishing companies, film studios, distributors), start-ups, small businesses,filmmakers, music makers and social entrepreneurs,with all of their personal, career, business and/or charity law needs be it talent representation or accompaniment through a deal or negotiations.
%d bloggers like this: